Home > Zoom Out > Creating Systems of Wellbeing

Creating Systems of Wellbeing

One burnt out candleIt’s not surprising how many of us consider “problem solving” to be one of our strengths. Simple human nature probably explains why our attention is consistently drawn to what’s not working, what’s broken or missing, what’s causing us inconvenience or pain.

And that’s not a bad thing. Because there are plenty of things that are broken right now.  From the classroom to the congress to the climate, there is no shortage of critical problems to be solved.

But what if our relentless focus on Fixing is undermining our best intentions? As we consume an endless litany of examples of human suffering, wrongdoing, short-sightedness, and imperfection do we lose track of what IS working and diminish the spiritedness we need to envision and create our best future?

One of the exercises my partners and I feature in our Coaching from a Systems Perspective course is called the Engine for Success. In it, participants identify those mutually reinforcing variables that are feeding their success as coaches and leaders. For example, curiosity feeds learning, which in turn feeds curiosity.

From November 6 through 8, we’ll be in DC facilitating conversations that similarly accentuate the positive at the 2014 Systems Thinking in Action Conference—a gathering of change leaders devoted to creating systems of wellbeing in our organizations and in the world.

I hope you can join us in spirit. Or even better, join us in person!

Advertisements
  1. October 27, 2014 at 11:12 am

    Great news about STIA — and such a relevant theme. I love your question about “But what if our relentless focus on Fixing is undermining our best intentions? And diminishing the spiritedness we need to envision and create our best future? It’s easy to feel helpless these days.

  2. October 27, 2014 at 5:48 pm

    Yes, Judy! Just spent the day at a workshop on the Cape Cod Model of systems intervention. One of the keystone principles for this coaching model is optimism. Presenter Janet Britcher pointed out that we have some natural inclination to fear as a matter of self preservation. So optimism can take some effort and require practice. But optimism itself can change our outcomes. So, here’s to possibility!

  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: